Do you want to volunteer for Clinical Trials? Register now

Volunteer for Clinical Trials

Have you ever thought about taking part in a Medical Trial? By registering your details with MedTrials.co.uk, we are able to send your details directly to companies who are looking for volunteers to take part in their medical research studies.

Information about you is kept on a register that CROs, Pharmaceutical companies and Clinical Investigators can access to contact you regarding individual studies.

Register now >

Why are Clinical Trials important?

Before a new treatment is tested in patients, it is carefully studied in the laboratory. First, a drug is considered because it changes cells or parts of cells in a way that suggests it will destroy cancer or help the body to deal with the side effects of cancer treatment. Then, the new treatment is tested in animals to learn what it does in the body. But this early research cannot predict exactly how a new treatment will work in people or define all the side effects that might occur. Clinical Trials are designed to help us find out how to give a new treatment safely and effectively to people. Each patient who participates in a Clinical Trial provides information on the effectiveness and risks of the new treatment. Advances in medicine and science are the result of new ideas and approaches developed through research. New cancer treatments must prove to be safe and effective in scientific studies with a certain number of patients before they can be made available to all patients.

Treatments now being used (standard treatments) are the base for building new, hopefully better, treatments. Many standard treatments were first shown to be effective in Clinical Trials. Clinical Trials show researchers which therapies are more effective than others. This is the best way to identify an effective new treatment. New therapies are designed to take advantage of what has worked in the past and to improve on this base.

You may be interested in participating in a trial. You should learn as much as you can about the trial before you make up your mind.

Clinical Trials are the most reliable and best way of testing a new treatment, or of seeing whether one treatment works better than another. A new treatment is not always better, and can sometimes be worse than existing treatments. Trials are therefore really important when we need to know whether one treatment is safer and more effective than another.

We need Clinical Trials to improve treatment and care for patients now and in the future.

Many of the treatments now commonly used in the NHS have been tested through Clinical Trials. For example, in cancer care, trials have been used to try out new treatments – radiotherapy, chemotherapy, surgery, and complementary therapies. Trials have also been used to find out the best ways of using these treatments. This has meant that many people with cancer, HIV/AIDS and many other illnesses live longer and have a better quality of life.

Useful Medical Trial information

News

Stroke: Clinical trial results ‘likely to change care practice’

A large international clinical trial suggests that an anticoagulant and aspirin combination may be the way to go when it comes to preventing major stroke. Powered by WPeMatico

more >

Parkinson’s: Targeting new compound slows disease in rats

The results of a decade-long study are in: a new therapeutic target is found, and scientists manage to slow the progression of the disease in animals. Powered by WPeMatico

more >

Added to chemotherapy, this drug doubles lung cancer survival

Adding immunotherapy to chemotherapy doubled survival in a trial of metastatic nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer lacking EGFR and ALK mutations. Powered by WPeMatico

more >

New drug halves previously untreatable migraine attacks

A new compound, called erenumab, was found to be successful in treating migraines for which other treatments had previously failed. Powered by WPeMatico

more >

Antidepressants: Do they really work?

The debate over whether antidepressants can really help to tackle depression has been rife. We take a closer look at the evidence. Powered by WPeMatico

more >

Can we trust results from early clinical trials?

A new analysis demonstrates that early clinical trials looking at new treatments are more likely to produce exaggerated results. Why could this be? Powered by WPeMatico

more >